Raised Planter Box Instructions

A few years ago, I decided I wanted to learn to build things.  I'd been shopping for goodies for my house and could not find exactly what I wanted.  I figured, "If I can't find it, I can learn to make it!"

(Also, I wanted a garden shed shaped like TARDIS and the only way to get one was to make it myself.)

Well, I've yet to get around to the TARDIS shed, but in the meantime, I've made a bunch of really boss things, including this raised planter box, inspired by Ana White's Cedar Planter for Less Than $20.  This planter box is three feet tall, about 18 inches deep, and about 58 inches wide.

Tools:
Tape Measure
Pencil
Safety glasses
Ear protection
Drill
Kreg Jig R3 with Classic 3" Face Clamp
Speed Square
Brad Nailer
Circular saw (or miter saw)
 
Shopping List:
14 - 7/16” x 4” x 6’ fence pickets
10 - 1” x 3” x 8’
3 - 2” x 2” x 8’
1.25” Kreg "Blue Kote" (outdoor) pocket screws
1” galvanized nails
Exterior wood glue
Gardening fabric

Cut List:
36 - 4” x 21” fence pickets
6 - 1” x 3” x 14.75” (these are side and interior frame supports)
8 - 1” x 3” x 26” (these are front and back frame supports)
6 - 2” x 2” x 36” (these are the legs)
2 - 1” x 3” x 54” (these are the interior slat supports)
12 - 1” x 3” x 14” (the are the interior slats)
2 - 1” x 3” x [see Step Seven, below]
2- 1” x 3” x [see Step Seven, below]

Note:
Please read all the instructions before beginning.  Please build safely!  

 

Step One:

On the “inside” of all eight pieces of 1” x 3” x 26” lumber, drill two pocket holes on each end with your Kreg Jig, following the instructions that came with your jig.  Following the diagram, build the back panel, using the 1.5” Kreg pocket screws in the pocket holes.  The 1” x 3” x 26” pieces should be flush with the outside of the legs. Leave a 16” gap between the to and bottom 1” x 3” x 26” pieces. Build another panel, which will be the front panel.  You will use all of your  2” x 2” x 36” “leg pieces” and all of your 1” x 3” x 26” “front and back frame supports.”

Step Two:


On the “inside” of all six pieces of 1” x 3” x 14.75” lumber, drill two pocket holes on each end with your Kreg Jig, following the instructions that came with your jig.  Following the diagram, connect the front and back panels, using exterior wood glue and the 1.5” Kreg pocket screws in the pocket holes.

Step Three:


It’s hammer brad nailer time!  Load up your brad nailer with 1” galvanized nails and adjust the settings to ensure the nails won’t go too far and poke out the other side.  Following the diagram, attach the 4” x 21” fence pickets pieces from the inside of the planter, using exterior wood glue and your 1” galvanized nails.  Go all the way around (even though the diagram only shows one front panel and one side panel).  As each "4-inch-wide" picket is really only about 3.5" wide, each front and back section gets seven pickets, and each side section gets four pickets.  You will use all of your fence picket pieces.

Step Four:


Line up one 1” x 3” x 54” “interior slat support” piece inside the planter.  Mark the center of the piece, where it meets the center leg.  Drill two pocket holes here with your Kreg Jig, following the instructions that came with your jig.  Line up this 1” x 3” x 54” piece inside the planter 10” down from the top.  Using exterior wood glue and the 1.5” Kreg pocket screws in the pocket holes, attach this “interior slat support” to the leg.  This may require some creative maneuvering to get the Kreg Jig pocket screw bit in there.  I also slather a ton of wood glue on the ends.

Step Five:


Do another “Step Four,” just on the other interior side of the planter.

Step Six:


Lay your 12 “interior slat” 1” x 3” x 14” pieces inside the planter, resting on the “interior slat support” pieces.  You can secure these with glue and nails, if you wish, or you want wait to place these pieces in the planter until you’re ready to line the planter with gardener’s fabric and soil.

Step Seven:


The time has come to make your decorative top ledge.  If you’re feeling fancy, you can make mitered 45* corners.  Truthfully, I just "wing" it at this point, measuring as I go along to make sure my ledge fits the planter as it has actually been built.

Step Eight: Finishing!
Fill holes with food filler, sand the project, and finish for outdoor use with something like Helmsman Spar Urethane.  Line the inside with gardener’s fabric, fill with soil, and get growing!

  (Illustrations by Jenifer Katehos in SketchUp)

 

 

May 21, 2016 by Jennifer Katehos
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